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Wildlife

Information about wildlife.
Partners for Fish and Wildlife-US Fish and Wildlife Service- provides technical and financial assistance to private landowners and Tribes
Partners for Fish and Wildlife-US Fish and Wildlife Service- provides technical and financial assistance to private landowners and Tribes
Plant Materials Center Offers Tips for Fall Planting of Native Shrubs
Plant Materials Center Offers Tips for Fall Planting of Native Shrubs pdf
Playa post- July 2014
The Playa Post Newsletter is made as an effort to promote the idea that birds are an integral part of our environment and are essential for the health and beauty of the world. We envision a future when the ecosystems within our region sustain birds and other wildlife in concert with humans and our activities. This issue is from July 2014
Playa Post- June 2014
The Playa Post Newsletter is made as an effort to promote the idea that birds are an integral part of our environment and are essential for the health and beauty of the world. We envision a future when the ecosystems within our region sustain birds and other wildlife in concert with humans and our activities. This issue is from June 2014
Playa Post- May 2014
The Playa Post Newsletter is made as an effort to promote the idea that birds are an integral part of our environment and are essential for the health and beauty of the world. We envision a future when the ecosystems within our region sustain birds and other wildlife in concert with humans and our activities. This issue is from May 2014
Playa Post- October 2013
The Playa Post Newsletter is made as an effort to promote the idea that birds are an integral part of our environment and are essential for the health and beauty of the world. We envision a future when the ecosystems within our region sustain birds and other wildlife in concert with humans and our activities.
Resources for Private Forest Landowners in New Mexico
Are you a private forestland owner in New Mexico? You may be interested in learning more about your forest, improving the health of your land, creating better wildlife habitat, addressing wildfire hazard or improving the health of your riparian forest (or bosque), or learning more about forest industry. If so, you may be unsure of where to begin. The following pages contain resources for technical and financial assistance for forest landowners, including resources for forest health, forest thinning and more.
Restoring composition and structure in Southwestern frequent-fire forests: A science-based framework for improving ecosystem resiliency
Ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests in the Southwest United States are experiencing, or have become increasingly susceptible to, large-scale severe wildfire, insect, and disease episodes resulting in altered plant and animal demographics, reduced productivity and biodiversity, and impaired ecosystem processes and functions. We present a management framework based on a synthesis of science on forest ecology and management, reference conditions, and lessons learned during implementations of our restoration framework. Our framework informs management strategies that can improve the resiliency of frequent-fire forests and facilitate the resumption of characteristic ecosystem processes and functions by restoring the composition, structure, and spatial patterns of vegetation. We believe restoration of key compositional and structural elements on a per-site basis will restore resiliency of frequent-fire forests in the Southwest, and thereby position them to better resist, and adapt to, future disturbances and climates.
Restoring Flows and Ecosystems on the San Juan
Two decades ago, the San Juan River Basin Recovery Implementation Program was established to recover two endangered fish, the Colorado pikeminnow and razorback sucker, in the San Juan River and its tributaries in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Today, a diverse group of partners is working toward that goal.
Soil Erosion Control After Wildfire -Cooperative Extension, College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, The University of Arizona
The potential for severe soil erosion exists after a wildfire because as a fire burns it destroys plant material and the litter layer. Shrubs, forbs, grasses, trees, and the litter layer break up the intensity of severe rainstorms. Plant roots stabilize the soil, and stems and leaves slow the water to give it time to percolate into the soil profile. Fire can destroy this soil protection. There are several steps to take to reduce the amount of soil erosion. A landowner, using common household tools and materials, can accomplish most of these methods in the aftermath of a wildfire.
Some Weed Management Concepts for the Rio Grande Bosque
Presentation about managing weeds in riparian restoration projects. Gregory Fenchel, NRCS Los Lunas Plant Materials Center
Southwest Coordination Center for Wildfire information for New Mexico and Arizona
The Southwest Area (SWA) is one of eleven Geographic Areas across the United States and Alaska. It is established to manage collaboratively wildland fire and other incident management activities throughout the States of Arizona and New Mexico, and the Federal units located in the western parts of Oklahoma and Texas to the 100th meridian. Primary cooperating Federal and State Agencies in the Southwest Area include the USDA Forest Service, USDI Bureau of Land Management, USDI National Park Service, USDI Bureau of Indian Affairs, USDI Fish and Wildlife Service, State of Arizona (Arizona State Land Department), and the State of New Mexico (Division of Forestry).
Stream Ecology/Aquatic Biology Technician
Full time, seasonal position with Taos Pueblo WarChief’s Office, Ecology Programs Division, Wildlife & Habitat Conservation Department. Full-year career appointment anticipated within one to two years of hire date based upon performance and funding. On-the-job training and concurrent enrollment in professional/educational courses possible, depending on experience and qualifications. Stream survey to include aquatic (in-channel and lake) habitat; fish and aquatic organisms; stream ecology; and, full participation with Ecology Programs Division wetland and riparian assessment teams. Baseline analysis, condition assessment, restoration programs and collaboration on stream and habitat quality. Identify, collect and analyze fish, aquatic plants, insects and other species.
Tamarisk Coalition 2015 Conference
Despite our name, Tamarisk Coalition’s 12th Annual Conference is not just about tamarisk… Come learn about the latest advancements; from riparian restoration case studies, success stories, regional riparian management initiatives and challenges of funding, planning, and implementing riparian restoration, to exploring novel tools, techniques, and research. Through concurrent sessions, panels, Q&A, and field trips, you will learn new information about wildlife and habitat, biological control, biomass removal/use, native plants, streambank bioengineering, and more.
The Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) program
While many wildfires cause little damage to the land and pose few threats to fish, wildlife and people downstream, some fires create situations that require special efforts to prevent further catastrophic damage after the fire. Loss of vegetation exposes soil to erosion; runoff may increase and cause flash flooding; sediments may move downstream and damage houses or fill reservoirs; and put endangered species and community water supplies may be at risk. BAER addresses these situations with the goal of protecting life, property, water quality, and deteriorated ecosystems from further damage after the fire is out. Concern for possible post-fire effects on fish, wildlife, archeological sites and endangered species is often a primary consideration in the development of a BAER plan.
The June 2012 Albuquerque Wildlife Federation Newsletter
The June Albuquerque Wildlife Federation Newsletter,
The NM State Land Office has extended its Invitation to Bid on the Natural Resource Management Price Agreement until 9/27/16 at 2:00 p.m.
For those not familiar with the SLO Price Agreement for Natural Resource Management Services, here are the basics: • Price Agreements are standing contracts to provide certain services for a set price. • Price Agreements are not for specific projects. They are for various natural resource management activities. • They are divided into the following categories: 1. Vegetation Management (includes mechanical and hand thinning, chemical treatments, and slash treatments) 2. Prescribed Fire Services 3. Revegetation 4. Erosion Control, Road Management, and Post-Fire Treatments 5. Fencing 6. Project Management • A contractor can bid on any of the categories, but is not required to bid on all of them. • Bids are per acre, per hour, and daily rates depending on a particular category. Please pay close attention to the bidding requirement for each category. • Being selected for the Price Agreement does not automatically guarantee work. Contractors will be chosen for project work based on their capabilities, cost and time table, and past work experiences with the State Land Office and other land management agencies • Multiple contractors will be accepted for services. • Other state agencies, such as State Forestry and Department of Game & Fish, may utilize the Price Agreement for their project work. If you have any questions about the Invitation to Bid, please contact Sandra Lujan at State Purchasing Division at 505-827-0242. Contacts for questions about natural resource management projects are Mark Meyers at 505-827-4453 or Will Barnes at 505-827-5856.
The Pulling Together Initiative of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) - Request for Proposal
The program will award grants that will develop cooperative weed management areas (CWMA), support significant advances of existing CWMAs, develop or strengthen prevention and early detection/rapid response efforts, enhance education, and assist awareness projects to reduce or eliminate invasive plant species. The program is a partnership among the NFWF, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service. Pre-Proposal Due Date: August 3, 2016 by 11:59pm Eastern Time Full Proposal Due Date: September 29, 2016 by 11:59pm Eastern Time
Third Annual Rio Chama Congreso - Saturday, March 10, 2018 at Ghost Ranch, Abiquiu, NM
You are Invited to Participate with students and other citizens, agencies (Forest Service, Game and Fish, State Engineer) and non-governmental organizations (Rio Grande Water Fund, NM Association of Conservation Districts, Chama Peak Land Alliance, Rio Grande Restoration, others) and help to decide how to best address our water and land management challenges in the Chama Basin. Questions? Contact Steve Harris at home/office: 575-751-1269; 575-770-2502 cell or: steve.harris39@gmail.com.
U.S. Forest Service Research Assistantships for Native American Students
The Wildlife Society has announced the 2016 U.S. Forest Service Research Assistant-ships available to Native American students working towards a career in natural resources.
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